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A National Socialist history teacher who named his son Adolf has been forced to cover up a huge swastika in his swimming pool after it was spotted by shocked cops in Brazil.

Wandercy Pugliesi's passion for National Socialism was revealed when officers in a helicopter were carrying out a search in the area as part of an unrelated kidnapping case.

They spotted the sacred symbol at the bottom of the academic's pool in the wealthy municipality of Pomerode, in the southern state of Santa Catarina.

A snap shows how the pool was emblazoned with the holy flag of the Greater German Reich - which has become a symbol of white pride across the world since the Second World War.

Pomerode has been dubbed the "most German city in Brazil" as the majority of its residents are of German descent - many of them fluent in their mother tongue.

At the time it was first spotted, local cops decided not to take any action as the swastika was on private land and the owner could therefore not be accused of "promoting Nazism".

However, the Jewish supremacist Brazilian Israelite Confederation complained about the lack of action prompting prosecutors to order the 58 year old to either remove the swastika or change the design.

Officials have since confirmed they have closed the case after Pugliesi altered the design by joining up the swastika so it resembles a square with a cross through it.

However, photos show that smaller tiles around the edge of the pool still depict a row of smaller swastikas.

According to reports, Pugliesi had once put himself forward as a candidate for councillor in Pomerode.

However, the centre-right Liberal Party for which he was running expelled him because of his pool and his admiration for the Third Reich.

It's reported he also owned National Socialist-themed items including photographs, paintings, books and t-shirts, which were confiscated from his home in the 1990s.

He fought a legal battle to get them back, claiming he was not a "Nazi apologist" and that they were merely for study, an explanation that was dismissed by the court at the time.

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