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On Tuesday, the 150 participants paid their respects to "the victims of the Holocaust at three key memorial sites in Berlin".

In resolutions discussed at a meeting of the World Jewish Congress (WJC) Governing Board in Berlin, the delegates urged “authorities, publishers and book sellers in Germany to take appropriate steps to prevent the re-publication and sale of ‘Mein Kampf’ in book stores, including as an annotated edition, in the light of Germany’s special responsibility towards the victims of the Nazi crimes and in order to send a strong signal that books inciting to hatred against Jews cannot be sold legally in Germany.”


At the Gleis 17 memorial at Grunewald train station, from where the trains bringing Berlin Jews to the work camps departed during WWII, WJC Holocaust Memory Commissioner Charlotte Knobloch, 81, said: “We will not forget. Not us. The legacy of these six million people is our task, our obligation to fight for these people, for their remembrance and for our rights here and now.”

On Sunday the delegates and guests also took part in a rally organized by the Central Council of Jews in Germany at the Brandenburg Gate, where German Chancellor Angela Merkel and WJC President Ronald Lauder were among the guest speakers.

The WJC, which represents Jewish umbrella bodies in 100 countries, also criticized the United Nations over “the fact that several agencies and senior officials of the United Nations took a one-sided stand in the recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, including by appointing an investigative committee whose terms of reference were skewed against Israel in advance, and made unfounded accusations against Israel of deliberately targeting civilians in the Gaza Strip.” The international body reiterated its support for a two-state solution and urged Israel and the Palestinians “to return to direct peace negotiations.”

In a resolution on anti-Semitism in Europe, the delegates called for better law enforcement regarding hate crimes and lamented “that many European countries are not complying with international agreements in place with respect to combating anti-Semitism” and that “a large number of anti-Semitic acts are either not reported or not categorized” as such.

The World Jewish Congress urged “all countries to adopt a binding definition of anti-Semitic crimes based on the Working Definition of Anti-Semitism developed by the former European Union Monitoring Commission (EUMC) and used in a number of states' law enforcement agencies.”

(ejpress.org)

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